Thursday, September 18, 2014

What Becomes A Legend Most: Redde and Allemand in Tel Aviv (Sept. 9, 2014)

Thierry Allemand - or is that Avi Feldstein moonlighting in Cornas?

 Elad Levy and Uri Kaftori put together a joint presentation of their two latest gems, Michel Redde and Thierry Allemand. I'd already tasted through 80% of their Redde offerings quite recently, so basically I came along to taste the Champs des Billon, which I had laid away as the domaine recommends to age it  further - and of course, to taste the legendary, rare, expensive Cornas legend, Allemand.

It was nice to drink the first four wines without any compulsion to take down tasting notes. I will, however, say that the differences between the Pouilly bottlings and the Sancerre are very obvious in the context of a tasting, the Sancerre  showing very clean and fruity, the various permutations of Pouilly very funky and minerally. Uri says the domaine Pouilly and the single vineyards see oak to give them a smokier character, although from my experience, the Sancerre also shows a somewhat similar mineral laden attitude given time and air.

And as for the bottle I hadn't tasted:

Michel Redde, Pouilly-Fumé , Les Champs des Billon, 2011

Monolithic, yet more elegant than the Cornets (the other single vineyard, similarly priced), showing lime and minerals. The Cornets is really more likeable right now but damn, they're both great - so buy them both. Hell, buy 'em all, even if it means cutting down on your Chablis! (259 NIS)

But I really came for Allemand, didn't I? And his wines performed as advertised.

Thierry Allemand, Cornas, Les Chailliots, 2011

The nose shows manure at first, then aged meat over black fruit. I'm struck by how the terrifically juicy fruit shows such great focus and depth. And what length! This has the weight of Hermitage with the clean purity of a juicy Saint Joseph, and, although outrageously young, is already very complex and elegant due to its fine tannins.

Thierry Allemand, Cornas, Les Reynards, 2011

This cuvee is sourced from old vines, up to 90 years old, whereas the Les Chaiiliots comes from younger vines, 5 to 40 years old (still fairly mature at the extreme of the range), and as is usually the case, the older vines offer more of everything. Thus, this is more reserved, more tanninc, longer by at least a leg length, and overall feels more 'serious' and moody. As well, it's more refined and the meat aromas are tempered by black pepper. In both cases, I am struck by the purity. These are classics that will likely carve in a niche in your heart.

The pair costs 950 NIS and are not sold separately.

No comments: